Handle suicidal Behavior, prevention is possible!

Handle suicidal behavior with suicide prevention techniques. Suicide is the act of taking one’s own life on purpose. Suicidal behavior is any action that could cause a person to die, such as taking a drug overdose or crashing a car on purpose. Suicide can be prevented, not with any proven certain techniques but with care and healthy talk with such a person.

Causes

Suicide and suicidal behavior usually occur in people with one or more of the following various medical or situational reasons.

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Depression
  • Drug or alcohol dependence
  • Schizophrenia
  • Stressful life issues, such as serious financial or relationship problems
  • Feeling ashamed, guilty, or like a burden to others
  • Feeling like a victim
  • Feelings of rejection, loss, or loneliness
  • Aging (the elderly have the highest rate of suicide)
  • Death of a loved one
  • Dependence on drugs or alcohol
  • Emotional trauma
  • Serious physical illness
  • Unemployment or money problems
  • Breaking up in relationship.

Most suicide attempts do not result in death. Many of these attempts are done in a way that makes rescue possible. These attempts are often a cry for help. This is the right time to help such people.

Symptoms

Often, but not always, a person may show certain symptoms or behaviors before a suicide attempt, including:

  • Having trouble concentrating or thinking clearly
  • Giving away belongings
  • Talking about going away or the need to “get my affairs in order”
  • Suddenly changing behavior, especially calmness after a period of anxiety
  • Losing interest in activities they used to enjoy
  • Performing self-destructive behaviors, such as heavily drinking alcohol, using illegal drugs, or cutting their body
  • Pulling away from friends or not wanting to go out
  • Suddenly having trouble in school or work
  • Talking about death or suicide, or even saying that they want to hurt themselves
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or guilty
  • Changing sleep or eating habits
  • Arranging ways to take their own life (such as buying a gun or many pills)

Is suicide prevention possible with medical treatment?

People who are at risk for suicidal behavior may not seek treatment for many reasons, including:

  • They believe nothing will help
  • They do not want to tell anyone they have problems
  • They think asking for help is a sign of weakness
  • They do not know where to go for help

A person may need emergency treatment after a suicide attempt. They may need first aid, CPR, or more intensive treatments.

People who try to commit suicide may need to stay in a hospital for treatment and to reduce the risk of future attempts. Therapy is one of the most important parts of treatment.

Any mental health disorder that may have led to the suicide attempt should be evaluated and treated. This includes:

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Drug or alcohol dependence
  • Major depression
  • Schizophrenia

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, ask them to call us

Suicide Prevention – Fact Check!

Suicide can’t be prevented with certainty, but risks can often be reduced with timely intervention. Research suggests that the best way to prevent suicide is to know the risk factors, be alert to the signs of depression and other mental disorders, recognize the warning signs for suicide, and intervene before the person can complete the process of self-destruction.

What Should I Do if I know someone is thinking of suicide?

People who receive support from caring friends and family and who have access to mental health services are less likely to act on their suicidal impulses than are those who are socially isolated. If someone you know is exhibiting warning signs for suicide:

  • Don’t be afraid to ask if he or she is depressed or thinking about suicide.
  • Ask if he or she is seeing a therapist or taking medication.
  • Rather than trying to talk the person out of suicide, let him or her know that depression is temporary and treatable.
  • In some cases, the person just needs to know that someone cares and is looking for the chance to talk about his or her feelings. You can then encourage the person to seek professional help.

Suicide Prevention – Practical Help Explained

If you believe someone you know is in immediate danger of killing himself or herself:

  • Do not leave the person alone. If possible, ask for help from friends or other family members.
  • Ask the person to give you any weapons he or she might have. Take away or remove sharp objects or anything else that the person could use to hurt himself or herself.
  • If the person is already in psychiatric treatment, help him or her to contact the doctor or therapist for guidance and help.
  • Try to keep the person as calm as possible.
  •  Take the person to an emergency room.

Most importantly give him a proper consultation! If you are in Goa or around, feel free to contact us and let us help and give hope to someone in need.